Dr. Kenawy's Glucose Support† (60 Capsules)

Dr. Kenawy's Glucose Support† (60 Capsules)

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According to the CDC, in the United States, 88 million adults—more than 1 in 3—have prediabetes. What’s more, more than 84% of them don’t know they have it. With prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes raises your risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. [1]

Most of the food you eat is broken down into Glucose (sugar) and released into your bloodstream. When your blood sugar goes up, it signals your pancreas to release insulin. Insulin acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. [1]

Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. [1]

If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream. Over time, that can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. [1]

Gestational diabetes occurs when your body can’t make enough insulin during your pregnancy. During pregnancy, your body makes more hormones and goes through other changes, such as weight gain. These changes cause your body’s cells to use insulin less effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases your body’s need for insulin. All pregnant women have some insulin resistance during late pregnancy. However, some women have insulin resistance even before they get pregnant. They start pregnancy with an increased need for insulin and are more likely to have gestational diabetes. [2]


There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant):

  1. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. Approximately 5-10% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. [1]
  2. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and can’t keep blood sugar at normal levels. About 90-95% of people with diabetes have type 2. [1]
  3. Gestational diabetes develops in pregnant women who have never had diabetes. Every year, 2% to 10% of pregnancies in the United States are affected by gestational diabetes. If you have gestational diabetes, your baby could be at higher risk for health problems. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after your baby is born but increases your risk for type 2 diabetes later in life. Your baby is more likely to have obesity as a child or teen, and more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life too. [1]

 

There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but losing weight, eating healthy food, and being active can really help. Taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education and support, and keeping health care appointments can also reduce the impact of diabetes on your life. The good news is if you have prediabetes, a CDC-recognized lifestyle change program can help you take healthy steps to reverse it. [1]


Alterations in glucose metabolism can have a significant impact on overall health. There have been many studies that demonstrate the beneficial effects of numerous vitamins, minerals, herbs and other compounds on glucose metabolism.†

 

Dr. Kenawy’s Glucose Support formula offers several patented and trademarked ingredients backed by scientific research demonstrating their positive effects on glucose control. Our Glucose Support formula is a comprehensive and synergistic combination of minerals, herbs and other nutraceuticals, specifically designed to help support normal, healthy blood glucose levels. 

 

Features:

  • Contains several branded and trademarked ingredients such as GlucoHelp®, L-OptiZinc®, and ChromeMate®, all of which have numerous scientific studies to support their efficacy and safety.
  • Contains synergistic ingredients such as alpha-lipoic acid, gymnema sylvestre, ginkgo biloba, and milk thistle, all of which provide support for abnormal glucose metabolism.†

 

Benefits:

  • The ingredients in this formula have demonstrated, in numerous scientific studies, to support healthy blood sugar metabolism and provide support for some of the common complications associated with abnormal glucose metabolism.†
  • GlucoHelp™ (Lagerstroemia speciosa) standardized to 1% corosolic acid has been shown to support normal, healthy blood glucose levels.†
  • Gymnema sylvestre has been shown to support normal, healthy blood sugar, as well as insulin production.†
  • ChromeMate® has numerous scientific studies demonstrating its safety and efficacy in supporting healthy blood glucose metabolism, particularly helping to support normal, healthy insulin function.†
  • Vanadyl sulfate seems to have a similar effect to chromium, helping support normal, healthy insulin function.†
  • Jerusalem artichoke and fenugreek are included to provide synergistic support for healthy blood sugar levels.† They work to slow down the absorption of glucose in the intestinal tract.†
  • Ginkgo biloba, bilberry, alpha-lipoic, and citrus bioflavonoids help provide support for the neurological and vascular systems which might be affected by high blood glucose levels.†
  • Milk thistle helps support and protect the liver from the effects associated with abnormal glucose metabolism.†


These statements have not been evaluated by The Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Information and statements made are for education purposes and are not intended to replace the advice of your General Practitioner. If you have a severe medical condition or health concern, see your physician.

 

References:

[1] CDC. (2020, June 11). What is Diabetes? Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/diabetes.html

[2] CDC. (2019, May 30). Gestational Diabetes. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/basics/gestational.html